Frydenberg: Cost and charging infrastructure concerns have led to slow EV growth in Australia

Frydenberg: Cost and charging infrastructure concerns have led to slow EV growth in Australia

At a recent Energy Networks event in Australia, Federal Energy and Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg said that the main reasons affecting the growth of electric vehicles (EVs) in the country are the high cost of EVs and the lack of national EV charging infrastructure.

With global research having revealed that subsidies are the best way to promote the adoption of EVs, and push a switchover from fossil fuels, the statement by Frydenberg clearly implies that it is not a lack of taxpayer-funded incentives that is the key hurdle behind the relatively slow EV take-up in Australia.

According to Frydenberg, the poor level of EV take-up rate in Australia is largely a consequence of the fact that the cost of EVs is much higher in comparison to other cars. In specific figures, Frydenberg said that “thirteen out of sixteen of EVs that are on sale in Australia cost more than $60,000.”

Against the backdrop of the figures which show that there were only 7340 electric and PEHV vehicles in Australia in 2017, Frydenberg also said travel distance in such a large country is another reason for slow EV uptake because people are concerned about the distance they can travel before they have to recharge their EVs.

Moreover, with figures also revealing that Australia had only 436 publically available EV chargers in 2017, Frydenberg said that “the number of recharging stations” is another major concern for EV owners is the country.